5 Quick Facts About the Paris Climate Change Agreement

5 Quick Facts About the Paris Climate Change Agreement

It seems you can not read the newspaper or turn on the television without reading a new study on climate change. With melting ice and dying species, things are a bit scary.

And given the recent incident, it seems the discussion is more heated than ever.

President Trump’s decision to remove the United States from the Paris Climate Change Agreement was a controversial decision, to say the least. Previously, the U.S. working with 195 other countries to try and combat the effects of global warming.

But what exactly is the Accord and what does international diplomacy mean?

Keep reading some quick facts to speed you up.

5 Quick Facts About the Paris Climate Change Agreement
1. United States Can not Stop Out Overnight

It will take several years before the U.S. officially performed with the Paris Accord. While Trump’s decision made headlines, the withdrawal would take more time than he thought.

How long will it take for the United States to revoke their membership? About 4 years, which coincides with the next presidential election.

This means that Trump’s decision could be easily reversed if he had not served a second term.

2. There are only 3 States Not Participating in the Agreement

Initially, there were only two countries – Nicaragua and Syria – that did not enter the Accord. If President Trump’s decision is established, the United States will be the third.

Even areas that are U.S. has traditionally had problems with Russia and North Korea participating.

3. The Paris Climate Change Agreement Not legally binding

Apparently, the reason Nicaragua refused entry was for this reason. While the country recognizes climate change as a very real threat, they believe it depends on rich countries to combat changes first.

And therein lies one of the most important aspects of the Accord. This is not a legally binding document, so no one can hold a country’s legs to fire. Participation is entirely voluntary.

4. China and India Complicate Matters

And since the Accord is voluntary, there are no real consequences – at least not yet.

China and India propose the two biggest threats to combat climate change, as both countries produce large amounts of carbon emissions.

You may recall President Trump’s statement that, “China can do anything they want for 13 years” while the U.S. should reduce coal production. In fact, this is touted as one of the main reasons for removing U.S. of the conversation.

His statement, however, is simply not true. PolitiFact indicates that the document does not prohibit any country from anything.

5. Most State Representatives Are Not Pleased With Their Decisions

Some countries have said that they do not follow the orders of the President. In fact, New York and California have promised to reduce their emissions.

In an unprecedented move, Trump’s decision brings together bipartisan efforts to combat climate change.

What to watch out for
The following months will be an interesting time for climate discussions. With countries now leading efforts to combat air pollutants, this is not a fight that will soon subside.